The Centre for Critical Studies was incorporated in the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities in August 2015.

The information in this website is therefore out of date but retained for archival and staff purposes.

Julie Bishop awards Professor Graeme Turner the ARC Federation Fellowship
Julie Bishop awards Professor Graeme Turner the ARC Federation Fellowship

 

Researchers and other staff in the Centre have produced a wide variety of important and interesting work, whether it is in academic research, or support of that research by general staff. Occasionally this work is acknowledged externally for its excellence, in the form of grants, awards, presentations, and honours. This page summarises the significant achievements of the Centre's staff since its inception in 2000.

 

List of Achievements

November 2013: Emeritus Professor Graeme Turner is part of a successful research team that received funding for an ARC Discovery Project.

June 2013: Professor Gay Hawkins and Dr Morgan Richards secure funding for ARC Linkage Project with ABC.

November 2012: Professor Gay Hawkins is elected as a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities.

November 2012: Professor Gay Hawkins is successful in 2012 ARC funding round.

February 2012: Professor Graeme Turner is re-appointed to the new-look Prime Minister's Science, Engineering and Innovation Council (PMSEIC).

October 2010: Dr Anna Pertierra, Professor Graeme Turner and Associate Professor Anita Harris are successful in 2010 ARC funding round.
 
October 2009: Dr Mark Andrejevic and Dr Melissa Bellanta are succesful in 2009 ARC funding round.
 
July 2009: Dr Melissa Bellanta wins the 2008 John Barrett Award for Australian Studies.
 
September 2008: Professor Graeme Turner is appointed to the Prime Minister's Science, Engineering and Innovation Council (PMSEIC).
 
June 2008: The Centre wins award for Most Improved Green Office Area.
 
September 2007: Dr Melissa Gregg is awarded a UQ Foundation Research Excellence Award.
 
June 2007: The Centre wins award for Best New Green Office.
 
May 2006: Professor Graeme Turner is awarded with a Federation Fellowship.
 
December 2005: Dr Gerard Goggin and Associate Professor Christopher Newell receive the Human Rights Arts Non-Fiction Award, for their book Disability in Australia: Exposing a Social Apartheid, UNSW Press, 2004.
 
November 2004: Professor Graeme Turner is elected as President of the Australian Academy of the Humanities, for a three-year term.
 
October 2004: Dr Gerard Goggin is awarded an Australian Research Fellowship for his project "Mobile Culture: A Biography of the Mobile Phone".
 
September 2004: Dr Gerard Goggin receives University of Queensland Research Excellence Award.
 
August 2004: The ARC Cultural Research Network is approved as one of 24 Research Networks, with Professor Graeme Turner as convenor.
 
October 2003: Dr Mark McLelland is awarded an Australian Postdoctoral Award for his project "Local Culture/Global Space: Japanese Minority Sexualities and the Internet".
 

 

Details of Achievements

November 2013: Emeritus Professor Graeme Turner is part of a successful research team that received funding for an ARC Discovery Project.

Emertius Professor Graeme Turner was successful yet again in securing funding from the Australian Research Council. Graeme is part of a large group of researchers who will work on the Discovery Project entitled 'Transforming Cultural Fields' from 2014 - 2016.

This interdisciplinary project investigates the shaping of Australian art, literary, media, sport, and heritage fields, individually and collectively, by the changing national and transnational environment since the 1994 national cultural policy Creative Nation. Like Creative Nation, its primary focus is on the relation between these fields and the nation, but also pays particular attention to the distinctive forms of cultural capital associated within and across these fields, especially ethnic cultural divisions and the distinctive presence of Indigenous culture. This project’s empirical application and assessment of the concept of the ‘cultural field’ will contribute to the international development of cultural theory.

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June 2013: Professor Gay Hawkins and Dr Morgan Richards secure funding for ARC Linkage Project with ABC.

Professor Gay Hawkins and Dr Morgan received funding for a three year project entitled 'Making Animals Public: The changing role of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation in building public value and interest in wildlife documentary'. This project will critically assess the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's (ABC) changing role in building public interest and value in animals through wildlife programming. Historical and strategic industry analysis will document how the ABC contributed to the development of the wildlife genre in Australia and how new external production models are impacting on its public charter.

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November 2012: Professor Gay Hawkins is elected as a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities.

Professor Gay Hawkins has been elected as a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities, one of the highest honours available for achievement in the humanities in Australia. In announcing their new fellows for 2012, the Academy said of Professor Hawkins:

"She has played a key role in the development of Australian cultural studies as an interdisciplinary and philosophically informed practice of social reflection. In her first book, From Nimbin to Mardi Gras: Constructing Community Arts (1993), she undertook the first analysis of Australian community arts, and thereby made a substantial and original contribution to cultural policy. Her next two books, Culture and Waste (edited with Stephen Muecke, 2002) and The Ethics of Waste (2006), broke new ground in their exploration of the cultural and ethical significance of waste in all its manifestations and contributed to the formulation of a culturally informed environmental politics. Her other publications include The SBS Story: The Challenge of Cultural Diversity (2008, with Ien Ang FAHA and Lamia Dabboussy)."

More details here

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November 2012: Professor Gay Hawkins is successful in 2012 ARC funding round.

Professor Gay Hawkins received funding for a three year project entitled 'The skin of commerce: the role of plastic packaging in the construction of food security, waste and consumer activism in Australia'. This project will critically assess new approaches to reducing plastic packaging in food markets and waste streams and will produce key insights into how sustainable food systems can be organised with less reliance on plastic.

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February 2012: Professor Graeme Turner is re-appointed to the new-look Prime Minister's Science, Engineering and Innovation Council (PMSEIC).

Professor Graeme Turner has been appointed to the new-look Prime Minister's Science, Engineering and Innovation Council (PMSEIC). PMSEIC has been the government's peak science and research advisory body since it was established by the Hawke government. Professor Turner is one of six individual standing members chosen for their personal expertise and their contributions to science and research.

The Federal Government recently announced reforms to Australia's peak science and research advisory body to make it more relevant and responsive to the immediate challenges and opportunities facing the nation. Professor Turner was initially appointed to the Council at the end of 2008, when it was a much larger group of more than 20 members. At that time, he was only the second humanities researcher to have served on the Council.

More details here

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October 2010: Dr Anna Pertierra, Professor Graeme Turner and Associate Professor Anita Harris are successful in 2010 ARC funding round.
 
Dr Anna Pertierra was awarded a three-year Australian Postdoctoral Fellowship for her Discovery Project with Professor Graeme Turner, entitled ‘Locating television: an international study of the changing socio-cultural functions of television’. This project investigates the socio-cultural function of television in nation-states so far largely ignored by media studies: Mexico, Cuba and the Philippines. Combining cultural studies and anthropology, it uses publications and symposia to provide a more detailed global account of television's continuing influence in the post-broadcast era.
 
Associate Professor Anita Harris was also successful in receiving funding for her Discovery Project entitled 'The civic life of young Australian Muslims: active citizenship, community belonging and social inclusion’. This project investigates the ways young Australian Muslims contribute to community building and participate in civic life. It will provide information about their civic practices to assist policy makers and service providers develop effective methods to maximise active citizenship amongst marginalised young people.
 
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October 2009: Dr Mark Andrejevic and Dr Melissa Bellanta are succesful in 2009 ARC funding round.
 
Dr Mark Andrejevic was awarded a five-year Queen Elizabeth II Research Fellowship for his project, 'The Monitored Audience: Control of Personal Information in the Digital Era'. In an era when the internet can gather detailed information about citizens and mobile phones can target ads to them based on their location, consumers need a say in the policies and practices governing the use of their personal information. Research indicates Australians are concerned about the collection and use of their information. This project would explore what they are doing about it and what information handling policies and practices they support. The findings will provide a citizen perspective on deliberations over information and data handling policy as well as on ethical and legal debates about commercial monitoring at a time when the technology for capturing personal information continues to develop at a rapid pace.
 
Dr Melissa Bellanta was awarded a three-year Australian Postdoctoral Fellowship for her project, 'Sentimental blokes: a cultural history of working-class masculinities in Australia'. For decades now, therapists, academics and activists have called for Australian men to be more emotionally articulate. This is necessary in part because stereotypes of Australian masculinity emphasise hostility towards emotion, especially sentimental emotion. By demonstrating the significance of masculine sentimentality in Australia's past, this project will help to change this. Drawing on the insights of theatre and cultural studies and publishing in diverse forums, it will also bring a more interdisciplinary dimension to the history of Australian masculinities. Further, it will make Australian material relevant to international scholarship on emotional history, the relationship between class and gender, and gendered subjectivities.
 
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July 2009: Dr Melissa Bellanta wins the 2008 John Barrett Award for Australian Studies.
 
The John Barrett Award for Australian Studies is awarded annually for the best-written article published by the Journal of Australian Studies (JAS). In 2009, Dr Melissa Bellanta was awarded the Open Category prize for the best article by a scholar.
 
Melissa Bellanta, ‘A man of civic sentiment: the case of William Guthrie Spence’, Journal of Australian Studies, vol. 32, no.1, 2008, pp. 63-76.
“Through a case study of one man, this article contributes to recent conceptualisations of Australian manliness, in ways that extend and challenge the dominant representations of bush mateship. It is eloquently written and the argument both rigorous and lucid. The idea of ‘civic sentiment’ has more often been applied to women and women’s groups at this time, but the use of a feminist framework of analysis to analyse men’s experience was particularly interesting and added to the article’s originality. The article is well located within relevant literature, and the argument that manliness found expression in civic sentiment is a valuable contribution to debates about Australian history and culture.”
 
More details here [pdf]
 
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September 2008: Professor Graeme Turner is appointed to the Prime Minister's Science, Engineering and Innovation Council (PMSEIC).
 
In his speech to the National Press Club on 3 September 2008, the Minister for Innovation, Industry, Science and Research, Senator the Hon Kim Carr announced that Centre Director, Professor Graeme Turner, had been appointed to the Prime Minister's Science, Engineering and Innovation Council (PMSEIC). This makes Professor Turner the only Humanities scholar on the Council, and only the second since the Council's inception (as the Prime Minister's Science Council) in 1989.
 
In his speech, Senator Carr emphasised the importance of the Humanities, the Arts, and the Social Sciences to innovation:
 
"Let me stress again that the humanities, arts and social sciences are absolutely central to the project we have embarked on. They have at least four different roles in the innovation process.

First, they drive innovation themselves:
  • especially the kind of incremental, process innovation that frequently goes unnoticed;
  • especially in the service sector; and
  • often in unexpected ways – I love the story about how creative writers at Edith Cowan University are helping Alzheimer’s patients recover and retain memories.


Second, they raise the standard of scientific and technical innovation by shining an inquiring and sometimes critical light on its ethical, historical, cultural, and social consequences.

Third, they give people the skills they need to use the innovations coming out of our laboratories and R&D centres.

And fourth, they empower individuals and communities to deal with change – whether by adapting to it, or by asserting their own view of how it should happen.

We simply can’t achieve the goals we’ve set ourselves without you. That’s why these disciplines have loomed so large in our work to date"


Professor Turner is a Federation Fellow and Immediate Past President of the Australian Academy of the Humanities. This appointment recognises the work that Professor Turner has done with the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy committee while he was President of the Academy, as well as his many years of distinguished service to higher education and, in particular, to the development of Cultural Studies.

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June 2008: The Centre wins award for Most Improved Green Office Area.
 
The University’s  Green Office Program celebrated World Environment Day on 5 June with a breakfast at the UQ Staff and Graduates Club.  This event was attended by over 60 UQ Green Office representatives who heard a presentation on Climate Change, as well as having the opportunity to view a number of displays of environmentally preferred products.  The Centre for Critical and Cultural Studies received the award for Most Improved Green Office in 2008, following on from last year when the Centre was awarded Best New Green Office 2007.
 
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September 2007: Dr Melissa Gregg is awarded a UQ Foundation Research Excellence Award.
 

Dr Melissa Gregg was awarded $55,000 to investigate the extent to which internet and mobile technologies are blurring our public and private lives. Her project will offer first-hand knowledge and interview material documenting the new forms of mediated intimacy and friendship taking place online. It will further explain how these networks provide forms of support and community responsive to the changing nature of everyday life in information societies.

The UQ Excellence Award project is a development out of Melissa's ARC Postdoctoral Fellowship awarded in October 2006.

This project aims to focus public debate about the use of new media technologies to consider how people are leading lives that are always in a sense “online” and immanently tied to network structures and logics. It will offer detailed explanation of the features and benefits of online intimacy to contextualise privacy panics over new media. It will also relate the changing nature of privacy to broader social and economic conditions, suggesting that participation in online communities is valuable preparation for the labour conditions emerging in the network society. Key aims for the research are:   

  • to provide detailed analysis of social networking sites: this will take account of how social networking technologies are used as part of everyday life, foregrounding the forms of literacy and agency involved in their use
  • to understand the key features of online intimacy: including the intensity and temporality of internet-based friendship networks and communities and the “broadcast impulse” fundamental to successful participation 
  • to counteract the amount of youth-oriented research in internet studies by contextualising friendship sites in relation to other forms of online networking such as dating sites, job sites, interest-based communities and commercial dot.coms—all of which share common networking traits and appeal to diverse age groups
  • to draw links between online networking and similar trends in employment practices: for instance, by acknowledging the importance of “contacts”, “friends” and “testimonials” in online and offline personae, particularly for securing employment in middle-class, computer-dependent information jobs
  • to understand privacy in relation to changing social and economic conditions: on the one hand, to ask how privacy may differ in light of specific contexts of location, employment or class mobility in information societies; more broadly, to consider privacy panics in a longer history of middle-class subjectivity. Drawing on affect theory and contemporary notions of neoliberal identity formation, the research will pinpoint the entrepreneurial dimension to the broadcast impulse and how this reflects new understandings of privacy and the self.
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June 2007: The Centre wins award for Best New Green Office.
 
June 5th is World Environment Day, and the University's Green Office Program organised a ceremony to reward those in the UQ community who have excelled in their commitment to sustainable practices. The award for the best new Green Office was presented to Andrea Mitchell on behalf of the Centre for Critical and Cultural Studies. Andrea received a framed certificate and a $100 for environmentally preferred products from the UQ store.
 
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May 2006: Professor Graeme Turner is awarded with a Federation Fellowship.
 
The Federal Minister for Education, Julie Bishop announced on the 11 May 2006 the awarding of Professor Graeme Turner as a Federation Fellow. The report from the Australian Research Council reads, in part:
 
Professor Turner is a key figure in the development of cultural and media studies in Australia and has an outstanding international reputation. His work is used in a range of disciplines: cultural and media studies; communications; history; literary studies; and film and television studies.
 
Professor Turner has pioneered the study of the wider cultural impact on society of media and the economy of media industries that play a major role in trade and cultural exchange. His new research program will examine the role of television, a major source of the world’s information and ideas, at a time when the media is undergoing rapid transformation and on-line content and commentary are influencing the cultural views, political attitudes and patterns of consumption of a new generation.

Click here for more information on the project

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December 2005: Dr Gerard Goggin and Associate Professor Christopher Newell receive the Human Rights Arts Non-Fiction Award, for their book Disability in Australia: Exposing a Social Apartheid, UNSW Press, 2004.
 
Dr Gerard Goggin and Associate Professor Christopher Newell were jointly awarded the 2005 Human Rights Arts Non-Fiction Award for their book Disability in Australia: Exposing a Social Apartheid. The press release, in part, reads:
 
Disability in Australia explores a hidden blight in society - the ways in which the routine, daily and oppressive treatment of people with disabilities denies them dignity. It uses the everyday, untold experiences of life of people with disabilities to make a powerful and persuasive argument about social apartheid. Drawing on a wide range of case studies from health and welfare, sport, biotechnology, deinstitutionalisation, political life, and the treatment of refugees, the book firmly puts disability into a social, political and human rights perspective. The judges described the book as "provocative, well-written and informative". They said the authors successfully tackled an ambitious project and highlighted issues that did not usually receive as much attention as they deserved. The judges saw this book as managing to combine the qualities of a passionate manifesto and a cool academic investigation.
 
More details here
 
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November 2004: Professor Graeme Turner is elected as President of the Australian Academy of the Humanities, for a three-year term.
 
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October 2004: Dr Gerard Goggin is awarded an Australian Research Fellowship for his project "Mobile Culture: A Biography of the Mobile Phone".
 
In 2004, Gerard Goggin commenced a five-year project funded by the Australian Research Council, to study mobile phone culture, policy, and regulation in Australia and internationally.
 
The project aimed to:
  • study the mobile phone as cultural object, investigating its history, cultural production, consumption, political economy and regulation;
  • contribute new knowledge on the culture of new media technologies, elucidating the specific characteristics of new networked telecommunications technologies compared with older media forms;
  • develop new insights into central theoretical questions in cultural and media studies, such as the relationship between culture and technology, as well as debates on the place of political economy in analyzing cultural forms and practices;
  • develop innovative, new methodologies and theories for the study of new media.
 
The project takes an integrated cultural and media studies approach to studying how the mobile phone has developed in contemporary media cultures. It will study mobile culture from a number of different standpoints—history, production, consumption, representation and identity, political economy, and regulation.
 
In the respective six modules of the project focusing on these facets of mobile culture, appropriate methods will be used. The central case study will be the Nokia mobile phone, popular in Australia, Europe, Asia, and Latin America. Other case studies will include the phenomenonal takeup of Short Messaging Service (SMS), ownership and control of mobiles, globalization and mobile telecommunications firms, state policy and regulation of mobiles, ‘panics' about mobiles and radiation, and the discourse on mobile phone etiquette.
 
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September 2004: Dr Gerard Goggin receives University of Queensland Research Excellence Award.
 
Ten leading UQ researchers were honoured with grants totalling $655,000 at a gala ceremony at the UQ Centre on Thursday, September 23) as part of the awards for early-career researchers.  Dr Gerard Goggin from the Centre for Critical and Cultural Studies was one of the recipients for his project entitled 'Networking Youth Cultures: Mapping Digital Techonolgies in Contemporary Australian Life'.
 
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August 2004: The ARC Cultural Research Network is approved as one of 24 Research Networks, with Professor Graeme Turner as convenor.
 
In 2004 Professor Turner was successful in applying for an ARC Research Network, one of 24 networks funded through the scheme, and one of only three in the humanities. While not formally connected to the CCCS, the Centre provides material support for the CRN, including office space and other facilities, and Professor Turner is the Network Convenor.
 
Click here for more information on the project
 
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October 2003: Dr Mark McLelland is awarded an Australian Postdoctoral Award for his project "Local Culture/Global Space: Japanese Minority Sexualities and the Internet".
 
After English (43%), Japanese (9%) is the most used language on the Internet. No study has addressed the specific ways in which Japanese language use affects Internet communication or how the Internet is being used by minoritised groups and individuals. The project will examine Internet use by minority sexualities in Japan in order to ascertain how individuals and communities who fall outside the 'mainstream' of society interact with this new technology.
 
The project will contribute to our understanding of how the Internet, a supposedly global medium, also facilitates the emergence of very local subcultures. The project will result in a series of conference presentations, journal papers and a book.
 
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